Category Archives: Mindful Eating

BASICS of Mindful Eating Teleconference

avatars-000072455684-y8tfkc-t500x500In case you missed the BASICS of Mindful Eating teleconference last week, but still would like to listen to it, you’re in luck!

The recording is now available on The Center for Mindful Eating site, if you want to listen, or share it with others:

http://www.thecenterformindfuleating.org/Default.aspx?pageId=1863600

This can also be listened to directly on Soundcloud:

https://soundcloud.com/tcme-org/2014-june-26-basics-mindful-eating

At the end you will be able to do the following:

1. Name 3 of the 6 components of the acronym “BASICS” as a mindfulness-based approach to eating.
2. Experience a “Taste of Mindfulness” meditation to help you explore your thoughts, feelings, and body sensations.
3. Identify two challenges in stopping eating before you are too full.

You might also want to bookmark the Center for Mindful Eating Website.  They have lots of wonderful teleconferences and informative articles about mindful eating.

Happy 4th and Happy Eating!!!fireworks

 

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Eat for Life and the BASICS of Mindful Eating — Learn more for FREE!

Lynn_Rossy2-smallI’d like to invite you to join me for two learning opportunities next week. Please feel free to pass this information on to any interested parties.

First, I have been invited to do a Webinar about the Eat for Life study that will be published in the American Journal of Health Promotion with Michael O’Donnell, the Editor in Chief, on Tuesday, June 24, at 12:00 CST.  Eat for Life is the 10 week mindfulness-based intuitive eating program that I teach in-person and online. The results are quite exciting. You can sign up here for free.

Second, I’m doing a BASICS of mindful eating teleconference through the Center for Mindful Eating on Thursday, June 26, at 11:00 CST.  The BASICS of mindful eating is one of the concepts that I developed for the Eat for Life class.  Learn these guidelines (not rules) to help you become conscious about what, when, why, and how you eat. Understand how to use them as an approach to eating which pleases your taste buds and support’s your body’s health. Used on a regular basis, they could change the way you eat for life. You can sign up here for free.

 

 

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The BASICS of Mindful Eating – FREE Teleconference – Thursday, June 26 at 11 a.m. (CST)

I am pleased to announce that I will be offering my first teleconference with The Center for Mindful Eating on Thursday, June 26, at 11:00 a.m. (CST).  This is a FREE teleconference that will discuss the BASICS of Mindful Eating — guidelines (not rules) to help you become conscious about what, when, why, and how you eat.

teleconferenceThursday, June 26, 2014
9 AM PST / 12 PM EST
Registration Link

We will have time for discussion about mindful eating. We will practice a “Taste of Mindfulness” meditation to help you explore your thoughts, feelings, and body sensations–a skill that supports your mindful eating practice.  And, we will discuss the challenges that keep you eating past the point of fullness.  You know–to the point of uncomfortable or even stuffed!

The Conference Access Number is (559)726-1300
Your Conference Passcorde is: 858168#
or Skype: freeconferencecallhd.5597261300

I hope you will consider joining me for some fun conversation and learning.

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Diabetes and Mindful Eating

Mindful eating is important for all of us who want to be healthy, but it is even more important for people with diabetes.  I was pleasantly surprised when I received the latest copy of Diabetes Self-Management magazine and noticed “The Benefits of Mindful Eating” on the cover.  The article described the research that has been conducted on the effects of meditation and other mindfulness practices on stress, anxiety, healthy-related quality of life, and hemoglobin A1C, a measure of blood glucose control.

It reported that a few studies have now demonstrated that people with diabetes who complete an 8 week mindfulness-based program can significantly reduce emotional symptoms which often trouble people who are trying to manage a chronic disease and show improvements on biological markers of their disease.  One small study conducted in 2007 even reports that people who did not change their diets, level of physical activity, or medication, but did practice meditation for 8 weeks, had improvement in their blood glucose control.

Anecdotally, I had a friend with diabetes who took a weekly meditation class with me for years and she would check her levels right after the class.  She said that her levels were better after meditation than any other time that she would check.

Eat for Life ClassesIf you have diabetes or are just interested in being more mindful about how you eat, join me for 10 week mindfulness-based intuitive eating program designed to help you have a healthier relationship to your food and your body.  We are starting soon, so if you are interested, register TODAY!!

Here is the link to register for the online class which starts Friday, May 30, but you need to register by Friday, May 23. You take the class on your own time but you have practices and readings to do each week that relate to a particular theme. Email me if you are interested in the in-person class in Columbia, Missouri, which starts May 27 (RossyL at umsystem.edu).

Now take a deep breath and feel your body from head to toe before you proceed to the next activity of your day.  May you be mindful!

 

 

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March into Spring at your Local Farmers Market

Herb BasketI’m getting excited because our Columbia Farmers Market is getting ready to move OUTSIDE for the spring! They hold the market indoors for the winter but spring starts Thursday and it’s time to move into the great outdoors.

No matter where you live, visit your local market this week and join in the fun of eating local and eating healthy.  Get to know your local farmers and how they raise their food.  Ask them questions.  This is a great opportunity to support your local community, support your health, see your friends or make some new ones, listen to music, and get some fresh air.  You are what you eat. Eating fair, clean, and healthy food will get you ready to enjoy the summer ahead.

The Columbia Farmers Market will be at the ARC (1701 W Ash St.) on Saturday, March 22nd from 8am to noon (March 22nd until October 25th). Get ready for spring, warm weather and the outdoor farmers market! In March they’ll have fresh vegetables, pork, lamb, beef, organic produce, chicken, goat cheese, canned goods, baked goods, eggs, fresh pasta, plants, seedling and tons more!!!Featured Entertainment:  River Ghost Revue Creek will welcome you on opening day!

 

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The right way to eat–easy, delicious, fast, and good for you!

cauliflowerThe best recipes for me are ones that are easy and quick to make, good for you, and delicious—my idea of “healthy fast food.”  So, when I find a new recipe that fits all of those categories, I have to share it with you. I first had this dish when I visited my niece, Sarah, in Oregon last August.  It was absolutely delicious but I forgot all about it once I got home.  Fortunately, Sarah gave me a cookbook  over the holidays (Gwyneth Paltrow’s, It’s All Good) and the recipe was in there.  I’ve changed it only slightly. I’ll give you my version. By the way, despite some of the negative press that Gwyneth got about this cookbook, the recipes are often quite simple, very appealing, it reads easily, and has lots of gorgeous pictures of food—my idea of a good cook book.

Roasted Cauliflower and Chick Peas

14 oz. can of chickpeas, rinsed and drained
1 head of cauliflower, cut into bite sized pieces
Green olives (pitted) – approximately 3/4 cup (depending on how much you like them)
Extra virgin olive oil
Sea Salt
1 Tb.  Dijon mustard
1 Tb. seeded mustard
1 Tb. white wine vinegar
Freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup Italian parsley

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Toss the chickpeas, cauliflower, and green olives together in a large roasting pan with 3 Tb. of olive oil and a pinch of salt.  Roast, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are beginning to turn brown and the cauliflower is soft.  (about 30 minutes)

Dressing: Meanwhile whisk together the mustards, vinegar, and ¼ cup olive oil with a big pinch of salt and a few healthy grinds of black pepper.  After the chickpeas and cauliflower are done roasting, take them out of the oven and toss them with the dressing and the parsley.  Serve warm or at room temperature.

I served the dish with some heirloom tomatoes and this made a nice meal.  Don’t forget, you can roast almost any vegetable in a little olive oil and salt and it comes out delicious! Be adventurous and make your own version of this basic recipe.

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When all else fails, check in with the wisdom of your own body.

imagesCAXK8S3UThe problem: Conflicting and confusing diet and nutrition information.

The New York Times had an article on Sunday entitled “Why Nutrition Is So Confusing” that I want to share with you.  It resonates with me a lot, because I teach a class on mindful eating filled with people who come in confused about what they should or shouldn’t eat because of all of the different and conflicting messages we hear and read.  I am sure they are not alone.

Even when you follow the research carefully, as I try to do, you will be left shaking your head in wonder.  There are studies showing success on many diets –low carbohydrate/high protein, moderate-carb, high protein, moderate-fat, Mediterranean, etc.  Then there are the lists of diets that “experts” have determined are the best.  According to U.S. News rankings, even the Slim-Fast Diet made the list at #6 this year.  Granted, there has been research demonstrating it’s efficacy in the short term. The problem is that we also know that most diets aren’t realistic over the long haul.  You go off the diet and then you gain the weight back. Are you really going to drink Slim Fast all of your life?  Even if you did, chances are you will also eat a lot of other things that will not result in long term weight management.

The solution:  Mindfulness of the Body

In lieu of waiting for the definitive answer on what to eat and why, there is a fount of wisdom inside your body just waiting for you to listen.  It may take some time for you to really hear what the body has to say if you have ignored it for a long time.  However, before too long you will be able to discern the food it does and doesn’t like for you to put into it.  When you eat food that it likes, you will have more energy and feel healthier.  When you eat the “right” amount, you will not feel weighed down.

When I started mindfulness meditation practice, I was shocked at the messages my body was giving me that I had managed to miss for most of my life.  The first thing I noticed was the chemical taste of Diet Coke.  I had been a dedicated Diet Coke drinker for years and, all of a sudden, I REALLY tasted it.  The taste was so unappealing I immediately stopped drinking the stuff.  Do you really think your body wants colour (caramel E150d), sweeteners (aspartame, acesulfame-K), caffeine, phosphoric acid, citric acid and phenylalanine (the ingredients besides water in Diet Coke).  Granted, I still drink coffee and get my cup a day caffeine fix, but without the extra chemical additives.

Fifteen years after that discovery, I’m still checking in with my body at every meal to see what it wants and how much.  Just today at noon, at lunch with a friend, I looked down and saw that both of us had left food on our plates.  Just because there was food doesn’t mean that we needed to keep eating.  We were both full.  We threw the rest away.  My body feels good this afternoon because it’s not loaded down with food I didn’t want or need.

Body awareness is a key component in the road to weight management. Any program or diet that doesn’t include this as a foundation is likely to be doomed. Start your body awareness practice right now by simply scanning your body from head to toe (with particular attention to the belly).  Spend even a minute in this way and you can begin to notice and release tension.  Done before you eat, you are more likely to discern what and how much you need.  Practice with all of the BASICS of mindful eating and find out what you’ve been missing about what you eat and drink.

 

 

 

 

 

To re-train your taste buds and your mind to listen to your body, start by using the BASICS of mindful eating.  Here is a reasonable road to weight management.  If you followed these guidelines alone, you would solve most of your problems with food.

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Start 2014 with a successful non-diet approach to weight management!

eatforlife_colorlogoDo you eat when you’re stressed, bored, or sad?
Do you snack without noticing that you’re eating?
Do you have trouble not eating certain foods if they’re around the house?
Do you have a hard time not overeating? (e.g. eating until you’re too full)
Are you easily enticed to eat, even when you’re not hungry?
Are you tired of the endless diets that don’t work?

Well, of course, you answered “yes” to some of these questions. And, if you’d like to be more mindful about how, what, and why you eat, consider taking the Eat for Life program. This non-diet approach to rediscovering a healthy and joyful relationship with food and your body is backed by research at the University of Missouri.  After a 10 week control group intervention, participants became more conscious about what they eat,  ate based on physical hunger instead of emotions or stress, became more respectful of their bodies (exercising more and being less critical), engaged in binge eating less often, and became more mindful about everything in their lives.

Some of the things you will learn include:

  • BASICS of mindful eating (simple guidelines for eating)
  • The Three Food Wisdoms – no forbidden food, eating the “right” amount and knowing and respecting your patterns and triggers with food
  • How to stop using food as the way to deal with your emotions
  • How to savor your food and respect your body at the same time
  • …and much more!

Winter 2014 Online Class
Orientation: – starting January 24
10 Week Class:
– week of January 31 – week of April 4
Cost
: $50 for faculty/staff (and family members) of the University of Missouri ($25 to be refunded with full participation)
$180 for members of the community

Winter 2014 In Person Class (Columbia Only)
Orientation: Wednesday, January 22 from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Class:
Wednesdays, January 29 – April 9 (12:00 – 1:00 p.m.)
Cost:
$50 for faculty /staff (and family members) of the University of Missouri ($25 to be refunded with full participation)
$180 for members of the community

To register or to get more information, contact Craig Deken csdk89@mail.missouri.edu.

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Making Healthy Food “Hip”: The Broccoli Revolution

iStock_000015487644MediumIn case you missed the article  in the New York Times on Sunday, the question that was raised was “what if broccoli was marketed like other highly processed food we get tricked into buying?”  Michael Moss, the author of “Sugar, Fat, and Salt: How the Food Giants Hooked Us” asked some of the master marketing minds from big food corporations “How would you get people to want to buy and eat broccoli? What would your campaign look like? What would the message be? What would you do that all the well-intentioned government-funded campaigns have failed to do for generations?”

I have to admit that I often buy broccoli because I know it’s healthy.  I also have to admit that I sometimes just throw it away because it’s gone bad before I eat it. Why? Well, as I discovered from reading this article, I have become pretty limited in how I think about broccoli and don’t often think about putting it in the meals that I cook.  For instance, did you know you can grill broccoli?  As one the marketing slogans said, “Have a side of steak with your broccoli.” Just by reading this article and thinking more about how “awesome” broccoli can be, I have bought broccoli once, ate it, and really liked it, and I have found a new recipe with broccoli that I’m going to try later in the week (it’s a stir fry with broccoli and shrimp).  My mind seems to be fascinated with the idea of making broccoli exciting.

We are very conditioned by the messages in our heads and in our environment.  How many messages do you see for fresh fruits and vegetables?  If you did, how much more would you think about them, buy them, and eat them?  Mindfulness can help us break out of the ruts of conditioning and discover new worlds of food.  I challenge you to pick a vegetable that you think you only eat because it’s healthy.  Think about a cool marketing campaign for it, find some new recipes and try them out, approach the vegetable with a beginner’s mind that will allow you to see it in all its glory.  So much of what we do starts with how we think about it.  Change your thoughts and you change your reality.  Repeat after me.. “Broccoli is awesome.”

We are also very conditioned by our taste buds.  If you eat a lot of highly processed food or food with sugar, fat, and salt, then your taste buds have become less sensitive and less able to enjoy the delightful subtleties of fresh fruits and vegetables.  (See my blog “Mindfully Training Your Taste Buds”).  Mindful eating can turn this around for you.  You can re-condition your taste buds to discover the joys of broccoli and many other vegetables.

Watch this video to see the behind scenes story about the broccoli makeover.

Become part of the movement to make healthy food hip!

 

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Mindfully Training Your Taste Buds

kids-tasting-foodIt is amazing to me how trainable our taste buds must be.  I say this because many people at the beginning of my mindful eating class say they prefer to eat fast food, junk food, and processed food instead of fresh fruits and vegetables.  They prefer the taste of food laden with chemicals and pesticides and artificial colors instead of real food. I find this incredible—being the fresh fruit and vegetable lover that I am.  But, after getting over my shock at these exclamations, I decided to spend some time (and this blog piece) trying to address the problem of helping people change how they eat for the better yet encouraging them to “eat what they want” –a primary principle in my class. Continue reading

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