Category Archives: Mindfulness Tips

Five Tips for Mindful Emailing

tastingmindfulness-stockimage1Emails in the workplace often come with questions, work to do, goals to reach, and obstacles to overcome. That makes them inherently stressful or anxiety producing. Plus, communication is hard enough when we are face-to-face and email makes it much more challenging. Face-to-face we have the ability to read another person’s intentions and emotions. Over email, we are left guessing what the other person is trying to express. When you read an email that upsets you, it is often because a reaction is being triggered that may not be appropriate to the communication as it was intended.

Knowing this, here are some tips for what to do when you feel triggered emotionally by an email you receive.

1. Use the STOP sign technique before you respond.

S = Stop (do nothing)
T = take a breath (or five breaths or breathe until you’re more relaxed)
O = Observe (What are you feeling and thinking? Is this someone you have reacted to in the past? Is there a pattern of reacting that you can begin to understand better?)
P = Proceed (when you feel calm again, now you can respond if you need to)

2. After you have calmed down, re-read the email in question. Does it say what you thought it did? Or, does it say something slightly different? When I go back and re-read emails I often discover that they were much less of a problem than the first time I read them.

3. Put yourself in the shoes of the person sending the email. What might they be trying to accomplish? Usually someone doesn’t send an email to make you mad and, in fact, the email is often sent with good intentions. Assume good intentions whenever possible.

4. When you’re sending an email, check in with what you intend to convey. Never send an email that you’ve composed when you’re angry. Take a few breaths and wait until you’re calm. You will be much more capable at getting your message across in a way that can be accepted without defensiveness.

5. When possible, pick up the phone and talk or walk down the hall to speak to someone in person. While email is absolutely a necessity in this day and age, there are still times we could take advantage of some old fashioned face time.

The workplace is fast-paced and hectic. No wonder it can be filled with misunderstandings. When we practice slowing down, even a little, we can discover many new things in our communications with others. We can begin to illuminate the ways we get stuck in repetitive patterns and we can begin to understand how others operate so that we don’t take their messages so personally. When we practice mindful emailing, we have an opportunity to help the workplace be a little more friendly and manageable.

 

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Does stress make you overeat at work?

stress_eaterJack is sitting at his desk intently focused on his work. He is getting a little stressed because he has a deadline to meet and he has a lot of other work that is beginning to pile up.  Automatically, his left hand reaches down to the desk drawer that is filled with food in case he gets hungry.   Is Jack really hungry? Or, is he stressed?  Continue reading

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Just BE – 7 Tips for a Mindfulness-based Approach to Life

IDo you multitask your way through life? Do you find yourself constantly making a to-do list or planning? Do you feel restless if you aren’t doing something? Do you think you don’t have time to meditate or engage in other self-care? Do you eat to keep yourself busy or from being bored?  If so, then you may have become a “human doing” rather than a “human being.”

The art of “being human” has been lost in the midst of our need for entertainment, distraction, and constant motion.  In fact, I just asked the people in one of my classes if anyone felt their lives were too busy and every person raised their hand.  And, although everyone thinks they are too busy, if you ask them to sit and meditate or do yoga there is often a resistance to it. So, we have quite the conundrum.  I can’t “be” because I’m too busy.

Here are seven tips to help you become human again.  Try them on a regular basis and notice how you feel.  You can start with just one and work your way up. Each attempt to come back to sanity will be a healing moment for your mind and body. Continue reading

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BASICS of Mindful Eating Teleconference

avatars-000072455684-y8tfkc-t500x500In case you missed the BASICS of Mindful Eating teleconference last week, but still would like to listen to it, you’re in luck!

The recording is now available on The Center for Mindful Eating site, if you want to listen, or share it with others:

http://www.thecenterformindfuleating.org/Default.aspx?pageId=1863600

This can also be listened to directly on Soundcloud:

https://soundcloud.com/tcme-org/2014-june-26-basics-mindful-eating

At the end you will be able to do the following:

1. Name 3 of the 6 components of the acronym “BASICS” as a mindfulness-based approach to eating.
2. Experience a “Taste of Mindfulness” meditation to help you explore your thoughts, feelings, and body sensations.
3. Identify two challenges in stopping eating before you are too full.

You might also want to bookmark the Center for Mindful Eating Website.  They have lots of wonderful teleconferences and informative articles about mindful eating.

Happy 4th and Happy Eating!!!fireworks

 

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Eat for Life and the BASICS of Mindful Eating — Learn more for FREE!

Lynn_Rossy2-smallI’d like to invite you to join me for two learning opportunities next week. Please feel free to pass this information on to any interested parties.

First, I have been invited to do a Webinar about the Eat for Life study that will be published in the American Journal of Health Promotion with Michael O’Donnell, the Editor in Chief, on Tuesday, June 24, at 12:00 CST.  Eat for Life is the 10 week mindfulness-based intuitive eating program that I teach in-person and online. The results are quite exciting. You can sign up here for free.

Second, I’m doing a BASICS of mindful eating teleconference through the Center for Mindful Eating on Thursday, June 26, at 11:00 CST.  The BASICS of mindful eating is one of the concepts that I developed for the Eat for Life class.  Learn these guidelines (not rules) to help you become conscious about what, when, why, and how you eat. Understand how to use them as an approach to eating which pleases your taste buds and support’s your body’s health. Used on a regular basis, they could change the way you eat for life. You can sign up here for free.

 

 

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“Fed Up” Shows How Sugar Is Killing Our Kids!

child-drink-sodaAnd it’s killing you if you consume a lot of processed food or sugary drinks.

I just saw the film “Fed Up” last night which was produced by Katie Couric and Laurie David (Oscar winning producer of An Inconvenient Truth) and I was very moved by it. It’s not like I didn’t already know that processed food and drink were a major reason for the obesity epidemic, but I had not been exposed to the dramatic rise in obesity in children and the impact that it is having on them.

Try watching a teenage go in for lap band surgery because he weighs 400 pounds. Wrap your head around the fact that 93 million Americans are affected by obesity. One soda a day increases a child’s chance of obesity by 60%. One 20-ounce bottle of soda contains the equivalent of approximately 17 teaspoons of sugar. And don’t think that switching to diet soda is going to save you. Artificial sweeteners trigger the same parts of your brain that sugar does and lead to sugar addiction and compulsions to eat and drink more.

The old paradigm of “energy in/energy out” that says all calories are the same appears to be wrong. The calories in an almond are not the same as the calories in a can of soda. An almond can actually help lower glucose levels in the body and the soda obviously increases them substantially. In other words, a calorie is NOT a calorie. Different food and drink products affect the body differently and set off different processes that either enhance our health and help us lose weight or diminish our health and lead to gain weight.

The emphasis of the film “Fed Up” is that sugar that is the biggest culprit contributing to the obesity epidemic. The use of sugar in almost all of our food products came about through a number of governmental decisions about how to subsidize the agriculture industry many years ago and any efforts to change this practice has met with powerful food lobby resistance. Even the Michele Obama campaign against childhood obesity got hijacked by the food industry giants and turned the focus to physical activity instead of the food that children consume.

To learn more about the movie and the campaign to save our health go to http://fedupmovie.com/#/page/home or take the Fed Up Challenge and see what it feels like to go sugar free.

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The BASICS of Mindful Eating – FREE Teleconference – Thursday, June 26 at 11 a.m. (CST)

I am pleased to announce that I will be offering my first teleconference with The Center for Mindful Eating on Thursday, June 26, at 11:00 a.m. (CST).  This is a FREE teleconference that will discuss the BASICS of Mindful Eating — guidelines (not rules) to help you become conscious about what, when, why, and how you eat.

teleconferenceThursday, June 26, 2014
9 AM PST / 12 PM EST
Registration Link

We will have time for discussion about mindful eating. We will practice a “Taste of Mindfulness” meditation to help you explore your thoughts, feelings, and body sensations–a skill that supports your mindful eating practice.  And, we will discuss the challenges that keep you eating past the point of fullness.  You know–to the point of uncomfortable or even stuffed!

The Conference Access Number is (559)726-1300
Your Conference Passcorde is: 858168#
or Skype: freeconferencecallhd.5597261300

I hope you will consider joining me for some fun conversation and learning.

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Diabetes and Mindful Eating

Mindful eating is important for all of us who want to be healthy, but it is even more important for people with diabetes.  I was pleasantly surprised when I received the latest copy of Diabetes Self-Management magazine and noticed “The Benefits of Mindful Eating” on the cover.  The article described the research that has been conducted on the effects of meditation and other mindfulness practices on stress, anxiety, healthy-related quality of life, and hemoglobin A1C, a measure of blood glucose control.

It reported that a few studies have now demonstrated that people with diabetes who complete an 8 week mindfulness-based program can significantly reduce emotional symptoms which often trouble people who are trying to manage a chronic disease and show improvements on biological markers of their disease.  One small study conducted in 2007 even reports that people who did not change their diets, level of physical activity, or medication, but did practice meditation for 8 weeks, had improvement in their blood glucose control.

Anecdotally, I had a friend with diabetes who took a weekly meditation class with me for years and she would check her levels right after the class.  She said that her levels were better after meditation than any other time that she would check.

Eat for Life ClassesIf you have diabetes or are just interested in being more mindful about how you eat, join me for 10 week mindfulness-based intuitive eating program designed to help you have a healthier relationship to your food and your body.  We are starting soon, so if you are interested, register TODAY!!

Here is the link to register for the online class which starts Friday, May 30, but you need to register by Friday, May 23. You take the class on your own time but you have practices and readings to do each week that relate to a particular theme. Email me if you are interested in the in-person class in Columbia, Missouri, which starts May 27 (RossyL at umsystem.edu).

Now take a deep breath and feel your body from head to toe before you proceed to the next activity of your day.  May you be mindful!

 

 

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My Advice to People Getting into Mindfulness

bepresentjpgI’ve recently been asked to say, in one sentence, my advice to people getting into mindfulness.  There are so many things I would like to say that parsing it down to one sentence seemed like quite a challenge.  To help me and (hopefully) you in the process, I will share the advice that I’ve been given and have given to others over the years and maybe I’ll come up with one sentence in the end.  Let’s see what happens…

“Just Do It” – This is one of the first and best pieces of advice I ever received.  No, it wasn’t advice from Nike, but from Jon Kabat-Zinn and I’m sure he’s shared it with thousands of people around the world.  This advice has served me well and has gotten my butt on the cushion to sit in meditation on innumerable mornings.  You see, my mind never tells me that this morning is a great morning to get up a half an hour early to do my mindfulness practice.  But, I “just do it” anyway.

“Make space for formal practice” – When I say “space” I mean create an actual physical space where you do formal practice (e.g. a particular chair, room, place at work), but I also mean “space” in terms of setting aside the time for practice.  It helps if you write it down on your calendar or set your alarm.  You can even start with just a few minutes a day and it will make a difference.   Try even a couple of minutes during the work day and notice how you feel.

“Relax” – There is really nothing to do.  Mindfulness is an un-doing of all the things we think we are and how things are supposed to be.  Relax into the present moment with openness and curiosity.  One meditation teacher said “stop seeking peace and happiness and peace and happiness are here.”  Take a deep breath, relax, and see if you can sense the truth of that statement.

“Don’t give up” – Mindfulness practice is simple but not easy.  You keep coming back to the present with kindness over and over again.  Eventually you begin to get better at noticing when you aren’t present, and you stay in the present more often.

“Be gentle with yourself” – One of my favorite ways of describing mindfulness is “affectionate attention.”  You are gentle and kind with yourself, with others, and with your experiences.  We are such perfectionists in this culture.  Instead “try a little tenderness” as Otis Redding would say!

“Find a community or support group to practice with” – There is a great power and energy in practicing mindfulness with others.  We support and learn from one another in community and hold each other more accountable.

“Realize that everything is practice” – What this means is that you can bring your mindfulness to anything and make it a meditation.  In fact, your entire life can be a meditation.  You pay attention to all of your senses with kindness and curiosity.  You can do that anywhere and anytime.

So, I can’t really sum all of that up in one sentence, but if I only have one this is what I’d say.  “ Taste a little bit of mindfulness every day, even if it is one mindful breath, and do it with kindness.”                                    

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When all else fails, check in with the wisdom of your own body.

imagesCAXK8S3UThe problem: Conflicting and confusing diet and nutrition information.

The New York Times had an article on Sunday entitled “Why Nutrition Is So Confusing” that I want to share with you.  It resonates with me a lot, because I teach a class on mindful eating filled with people who come in confused about what they should or shouldn’t eat because of all of the different and conflicting messages we hear and read.  I am sure they are not alone.

Even when you follow the research carefully, as I try to do, you will be left shaking your head in wonder.  There are studies showing success on many diets –low carbohydrate/high protein, moderate-carb, high protein, moderate-fat, Mediterranean, etc.  Then there are the lists of diets that “experts” have determined are the best.  According to U.S. News rankings, even the Slim-Fast Diet made the list at #6 this year.  Granted, there has been research demonstrating it’s efficacy in the short term. The problem is that we also know that most diets aren’t realistic over the long haul.  You go off the diet and then you gain the weight back. Are you really going to drink Slim Fast all of your life?  Even if you did, chances are you will also eat a lot of other things that will not result in long term weight management.

The solution:  Mindfulness of the Body

In lieu of waiting for the definitive answer on what to eat and why, there is a fount of wisdom inside your body just waiting for you to listen.  It may take some time for you to really hear what the body has to say if you have ignored it for a long time.  However, before too long you will be able to discern the food it does and doesn’t like for you to put into it.  When you eat food that it likes, you will have more energy and feel healthier.  When you eat the “right” amount, you will not feel weighed down.

When I started mindfulness meditation practice, I was shocked at the messages my body was giving me that I had managed to miss for most of my life.  The first thing I noticed was the chemical taste of Diet Coke.  I had been a dedicated Diet Coke drinker for years and, all of a sudden, I REALLY tasted it.  The taste was so unappealing I immediately stopped drinking the stuff.  Do you really think your body wants colour (caramel E150d), sweeteners (aspartame, acesulfame-K), caffeine, phosphoric acid, citric acid and phenylalanine (the ingredients besides water in Diet Coke).  Granted, I still drink coffee and get my cup a day caffeine fix, but without the extra chemical additives.

Fifteen years after that discovery, I’m still checking in with my body at every meal to see what it wants and how much.  Just today at noon, at lunch with a friend, I looked down and saw that both of us had left food on our plates.  Just because there was food doesn’t mean that we needed to keep eating.  We were both full.  We threw the rest away.  My body feels good this afternoon because it’s not loaded down with food I didn’t want or need.

Body awareness is a key component in the road to weight management. Any program or diet that doesn’t include this as a foundation is likely to be doomed. Start your body awareness practice right now by simply scanning your body from head to toe (with particular attention to the belly).  Spend even a minute in this way and you can begin to notice and release tension.  Done before you eat, you are more likely to discern what and how much you need.  Practice with all of the BASICS of mindful eating and find out what you’ve been missing about what you eat and drink.

 

 

 

 

 

To re-train your taste buds and your mind to listen to your body, start by using the BASICS of mindful eating.  Here is a reasonable road to weight management.  If you followed these guidelines alone, you would solve most of your problems with food.

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