Category Archives: Mindful Eating

Endings and Beginnings!

When we practice mindfulness we see deeply into the truth that all things change–endings and beginnings are happening all of the time. While the current Tasting Mindfulness blog is ending on this website, a new and revised monthly Tasting Mindfulness newsletter is beginning on my new website. In order to continue to receive this newsletter, please enter your name on my mailing list.

51PGuB0QfZL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_When you go to my website, you will also see that I have published my new book, The Mindfulness-Based Eating Solution. It is so exciting to be able to spread the refreshing message of mindful eating to even more people.  Along with the book, there are mindfulness recordings that you can use to support your practice of mindfully engaging with food and your life.

The Eat for Life program will be temporarily suspended, but if you join my newsletter list you will be the first to know when it’s back up and running again.

I do hope you decide to join me in my new beginnings and adventures.  It has been a pleasure to be with you all of these years.

Enjoy and Savor!



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Strengthen Your Meditation Muscles

Lynn_June_Med_20824001_sResearch indicates that mindfulness is one of the most important skills for changing how you eat and how you feel about your body.  Mindfulness is a skill that helps you focus and attend to sensations like hunger, satiety, and taste, as well as increases kindness and self-compassion. Meditation practice is a method for strengthening your mindfulness. It’s like going to the gym for your mind.

If you’d like to know more, I’m conducting a three part series called Meditation and Mindful Eating for The Center for Mindful Eating (TCME) this summer.   This three part series will take of the mystery out of meditation, show you how to apply it to mindful eating, and help you establish a meditation practice of your own.

The cost is $10 per session or it’s free if you become a member of TCME.  Part I is on Concentration and Lovingkindness Practice, Part II is Mindfulness – Sitting Makes Eating So Much Better, and Part III is Making Your Meditation Practice a Non-negotiable Priority.  I hope you can join me! Part I is on Thursday, June 25, at 4:30 (CST). To register go to TCME.


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Mindful Eating at a Hotel Breakfast Buffet–Hold The Sugar Please!

Sugar2I recently traveled out of town and found myself scanning a typical hotel breakfast buffet to find something I could eat. Imagine my horror! If you immediately know what I’m talking about then this blog will be old news for you. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, then please continue to read, for your health’s sake. Continue reading

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Better Eating and Living through Mindful Self-Compassion

BE KINDWhat better way to start the new year than with a dose of self-compassion. Instead of letting the winter blues set in, find out how to warm the heart and shut out the cold.

What obstacles arise as you try to practice self-compassion? Find out how to overcome them in the latest issue of Food For Thought, a publication offered quarterly through the Center for Mindful Eating is now available.  Self-Compassion: Nourishing the Heart helps you to take a compassionate approach to your relationship to food and eating.

This article will help you

a) understand how a compassionate mind influences our brains, bodies and the way you relate to yourself  and others,

b)  try practical suggestions for a compassionate approach to relate to heart hunger in a way that allows true nurturing of the body,

c)  identify self-compassion as a key motivating factor for taking care of ourselves, including eating, and

d) learn four steps to adding self-compassion to your meals.



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Mindfully Having Your Holiday Treats

We are smack in the middle of the holiday grazing period.  All of the break rooms Happy Holidaysare filled with candy, cookies, donuts, chocolate, cakes, and pies.  Brunches and holiday dinners with family and friends have tables filled with an overabundance of food. What to do?

These are just a few simple thoughts I want to offer you as you make your journey through the daily opportunities to eat holiday delights.

  1. Mindfully assess the situation. There will probably more food than you could possibly try or taste. Pick out the items that you think look the tastiest and just eat those.
  2. Relax. Enjoy the food you’ve decided to eat and savor it fully.  If you relax while you eat, you will be able to register fullness sooner and you will be less anxious –therefore not in as great a risk to overeat.
  3. Eat as if for the first time. Sometimes those treats that we think we like don’t taste that great if we eat them mindfully. Try tasting your food with a beginner’s mind. I recently tried this with a class of Eat for Life participants. One person brought in “puppy chow” for us to try because she said it was impossible to eat it mindfully.  We each ate only three pieces of this chex, peanut butter, chocolate, butter, and powdered sugar concoction.  I doubt that most of us will ever eat it again. If the food you eat is only palatable eaten by the handful, you might want to question if you really like it.  If it’s food you still really like, then you will be able to savor it fully.
  4. Beware of your hand that unconsciously reaches for food. If your office is like ours, there has been a daily influx of holiday treats. People commonly say things like, “I didn’t even want the donut but it was there so I took it.”  I would recommend questioning that strategy.  Do you really want to eat it just because it’s on the table? Or, if you’re standing at a party, try standing away from the food so that you’re not just automatically reaching for food that’s an arm’s length away.  It is estimated that we make 200 food decisions a day on a regular basis, but I’m sure that number increases during the holidays.  Make mindful, conscious choices and you will feel much better after the holidays.
  5. Give yourself unconditional permission to eat. This is no forbidden food so you can eat anything that you want. Having holiday treats can be a wonderful way to celebrate. When you don’t prohibit yourself from having food then it is less likely you will binge on it.

If you eat more than you planned, don’t get down on yourself.  This is the hardest time of the year to eat mindfully.  Enjoy every morsel! Enjoy your life! Enjoy the blessings of the season! Your happiness will help you be the best you can be and eat in a way that honors your body.

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