Go to navigation Go to content
opener

Leaves (HR-400)

HR-404 Sick Leave Q&As

1. Are employees permitted to claim paid time off based on their daily schedule even if it results in regular pay in excess of their weekly FTE?
Employees can voluntarily elect to limit how much paid time off they claim in a week where they have worked hours beyond their regular daily schedule. However, departments cannot require employees to claim less paid time off in order to limit the amount of regular pay in a work week.

Example:

  Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri  
Regular work schedule 8 hours 8 hours 8 hours 8 hours 8 hours  
Actual Hours Worked Sick Day 9 hours 9 hours 9 hours 9 hours  
Hours paid 8 hours 9 hours 9 hours 9 hours 9 hours Total = 44 hours regular pay


2. Who can be designated as a Sponsored Adult Dependent?
Employees may designate a sponsored adult dependent based on who is eligible for Sponsored Adult Dependent benefits. See the “dependent eligibility verification" or visit the Total Rewards FAQ for more information which indicates a sponsored adult dependent should:

  • Be at least 18 years old;
  • Have a single dedicated relationship of at least a 12 month duration with the employee;
  • Have shared the same residence for at least 12 months and continue to share a residence;
  • Not be married to another person;
  • Not be related by blood to the employee or retired employee;
  • Be mentally competent to consent to a contract.

3. What does “in loco parentis” mean?
In loco parentis is Latin for “in the place of a parent”. For example, if an employee is responsible for raising their grandchild (or any other child) including the day-to-day responsibilities of caring for and financially supporting the child, then the employee is standing in loco parentis for that child. Therefore, although HR-404 does not allow the use of sick leave for grandchildren, when the employee is standing in loco parentis the policy would allow the employee to use sick leave because they are taking the place of the parent.

4. What does “individual who stood in loco parentis to an employee when the employee was a child” mean?
HR-404 includes “parent” in the definition of family. The language “individual who stood in loco parentis to an employee when the employee was a child” means individuals who stood in place of the parent. There could be several scenarios; however, a few examples include:

  • an employee who was raised by a grandparent.
  • an employee who was raised by a step-parent.
  • an employee who was raised by a foster parent.

An individual who had day-to-day responsibilities of caring for and financially supporting the employee during their childhood is identified as having “stood in loco parentis to an employee when the employee was a child.”

 

Date Created: 01/26/1999

Last Updated: 01/01/2014; 07/01/2018